Highly Experienced Specialist Mental Health Nurses

Enquire about mental health treatment and we will get back to you within 24 hours.

Enquire about mental health treatment and we will get back to you within 24 hours.

Community Psychiatric Nurses

Mental health nurses are responsible for planning and providing support, medical and nursing care to people who have a range of mental health issues. Mental health nurses work as part of a team of professional and medical staff that includes doctors, social workers, therapists and psychiatrists. They work in a range of settings, including hospitals and people’s homes.

They support people with issues ranging from anxiety and depression to personality and eating disorders or addiction to drugs or alcohol. Mental health nurses may specialise in working with a particular group, for example young people or offenders.

The main route into qualifying as a nurse is to take a nursing degree in one of the four nursing specialisms: adult nursing, children’s nursing, learning disability nursing or mental health nursing. Some degree courses cover two of these fields, and are known as ‘dual field’ degrees. Most nursing degree courses are three years long, with the exception of dual field degrees. Nursing degree courses provide a mix of formal teaching and practical experience

Key skills for mental health nurses:

  • Good health and fitness
  • The ability to empathise with people
  • Good understanding of the theories of mental health and illness
  • Excellent teamwork skills
  • Verbal and written communication skills
  • Resilience
  • Stamina

Book an assessment

Whether the enquiry is for yourself or a loved one, the first step is to talk to a member of our team. Please fill out the form below or call to speak to us about your circumstances.

At BREVIN we take your privacy very seriously and we use the utmost discretion when contacting you. Everything that we talk about is kept in the strictest confidence and will not be shared by BREVIN to anyone outside the organisation without obtaining your consent first.




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Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners

Psychological wellbeing practitioners are trained to assess and support people with common mental health problems – principally anxiety disorders and depression – in the self-management of their recovery.

They assess and support adults who are experiencing common mental health difficulties such as mild to moderate symptoms of depression, anxiety and low mood, offering a range of low-intensity, practical, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based interventions that help clients to manage their own recovery.

Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as high-intensity therapists, employment advisers, other therapists and support staff. Their responsibilities include:

  • Good health and fitness
  • The ability to empathise with people
  • Good understanding of the theories of mental health and illness
  • Excellent teamwork skills
  • Verbal and written communication skills
  • Resilience
  • Stamina

“The service is performing well and meeting
our expectations.”

Care Quality Commission | 24 May 2019
CQC OVERALL RATING:GOOD
View our CQC inspection report

Support Workers

Support workers employed by Brevin have mental health experience, providing emotional support and guidance for patients, including problem-solving advice, learning life skills such as cooking or budgeting, and social modelling (or learned behaviour). They are also referred to as care workers, (sober) companions and healthcare assistants. They don’t necessarily need any qualifications to become a support worker but require the right values and behaviours to work in social care.

Their roles include:

  • engaging with patients to establish trusting therapeutic relationships
  • supporting people with social and physical activities
  • booking and going with people to appointments
  • helping with personal care such as support with showering and dressing
  • supporting people with eating and drinking
  • monitoring individuals’ conditions by observing mental state, taking their temperature, pulse, respiration and weight
  • helping with medication
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